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Autumn colours and fungi

Emmetts Garden, Kent

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In the Rock Garden

A few days ago we paid a first visit to this fairly small National Trust run garden just off the M25 to the south of London. And what a delight it was!

The garden was developed in Edwardian times by Frederic Lubbock, a keen plantsman. He collected many exotic and rare trees and shrubs from across the world. Under the National Trust’s ownership it is gradually being restored to its former glory but is already a fabulous spot for a walk and for photography.

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View from near the entrance

There are wonderful views over the Kent Weald (this is one of the highest spots in the county) and a network of trails through the wooded slopes, in addition to the formal gardens. These include a Rock Garden, at its best in autumn when the acers glow red and orange; a Rose Garden; and planned areas of shrub planting to show off the more exotic specimens in a semi-natural setting.

Let me take you on a walk through the garden …

The Rock Garden

This was where we saw the most vivid colours as there is a great collection of Acers (Japanese Maple). There were also still some flowers in this sheltered spot.

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In the Rock Garden

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Acer in the Rock Garden

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In the Rock Garden

The North Garden

They are currently restoring this area to look more like Frederic Lubbock's original design, making more of the small pond at its centre. This is the highest part of the garden.

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The North Garden

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In the North Garden

Woodland Walk

Steps led us down to a path strewn with fallen leaves and prickly sweet chestnut cases. There were lots of fungi to spot among the trees, some of them tiny!

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On the Woodland Walk

The path led us to a viewpoint at the lowest point on the walk.

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View from Emmetts Garden

The South Garden

This is more open, with lawns dotted with trees, many of them vibrant at this time of year.

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Autumn colour in the South Garden

There were some interesting specimen trees, all labelled, and a white rhododendron having a late flush.

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Prickly heath bush from Argentina

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Rhododendron in the South Garden

While autumn is recommended as a special time to visit, I’m told by a friend that the woods are also stunning in the spring when the bluebells are flowering - and of course the Rose Garden would be at its best in the summer months. We will have to return ...

Posted by ToonSarah 03:30 Archived in England Tagged trees flowers colour garden autumn

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Comments

Hello, Sarah! Thanks for another wonderful story with stunning views...Keep well!

by Vic_IV

A lovely place to visit, to cheer you up in these sad times. Your pictures cheered me .. Thanks.

by alectrevor

Thank you for visiting and commenting so promptly, Victor and Alec :) And Alec, I'm pleased to have given you a lift - this beautiful garden certainly did that for me!

by ToonSarah

What beautiful gardens Sarah. They are beautiful and you have captured everything so well -- you really have a great eye when it comes to photography. I know I have said that many times before but it is still true.

by Wabat

Thank you Albert, I'm blushing

by ToonSarah

Oh I absolutely love autumn ... and spring. The colours in your photos are sensational.

by irenevt

A wonderful look at the magnificent autumn colors in Emmetts Garden for those of us who cannot visit it in person. Your photos are stunning, Sarah!!

by starship VT

Thank you Irene and Sylvia, I'm so glad you enjoyed these beautiful autumn colours!

by ToonSarah

I see what looks like a chestnut (the spiny thing). We had two huge American chestnuts in our yard up in the city. It was fine when it was green like that, but when they ripened and dried, all those little spines turned brittle and brown and would break off at the slightest pressure - impossible to walk in the yard barefoot. I think the people that bought our house cut them down.

We aren't quite to the full color yet here in Maryland as we have not yet had a freeze.

by greatgrandmaR

Hi Rosalie! That's a Sweet Chestnut - there were loads of them underfoot but of course we weren't walking barefoot ;)

We haven't had a freeze here either and won't for some time, but these acers go red regardless, as you can see :)

by ToonSarah

We made two trips to England a year ago, one in the spring and the other in the Autumn so we got to see the bluebell woods and the beautiful Fall trees. Both were a real thrill since we don't have them at home. There is some Fall color here but mostly in towns and cities where people have planted maple and especially sweet gum that they call liquid amber in California. I really enjoyed your beautiful photos. Thank you for posting.

by Beausoleil

Hi Sally, and thanks for the nice words about my photos :) I'm so pleased you enjoyed those trips to England. If ever it's possible for you to travel here again, at any time of year, we should try to meet up!

by ToonSarah

The gardens look perfect place to have a picnic! And your autumns colors look great!

Don't know the name, but that "ladybug flower" looks cute! :)

by hennaonthetrek

Hi Henna, and thanks for your comment :) I think by 'ladybug flower' you must mean the one I photographed in the North Garden? If so, it's an ornamental poppy - late in the year for them but it's a sheltered spot :)

by ToonSarah

I also like autumn, but I have to agree with your friend that spring is a nice time of the year as well. Here in Belgium we are known for a forest with bluebells ... if you happen to be in the neighborhood one day ... just yell and we can explore them together! :D

by Ils1976

A walk among the bluebells sounds lovely Ils - maybe one day ... :)

by ToonSarah

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